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12th Annual CERT Rodeo Round-Up

                                                                                  


NEWSLETTER

March, 2018


12th Annual CERT Rodeo Round-Up


HARRIS COUNTY, TX – More than 450 participants and volunteers attended the 2018 Harris County Citizen Corps’ 12th annual Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Rodeo on Saturday, February 10th at the Harris County Fire & Sheriff’s Training Academy in Humble, Texas.

Community Emergency Response Teams (CERTs) from around the state tested their skills in medical operations, search and rescue, fire suppression, incident command, and hazmat recognition. A total of 17 teams participated in a full day of hands-on activities. Event organizers agree that this event helps CERT members practice and improve their skills.

“Harris County’s CERT program is one of the strongest in the nation,” said Harris County Judge Ed Emmett. “The program’s success is due in large part to its partnership with first responders, non-profit agencies, local jurisdictions, and community organizations.”

The primary goal is to have all citizens participate in making neighborhoods safer by providing them the tools and training needed for preventing and handling threats of terrorism, crime, and disasters of all kinds.

“When a disaster overwhelms or delays first responders, CERT members can assist by implementing the basic response skills that they learned during their training,” said Harris County Emergency Management Coordinator Mark Sloan. “These skills can help save lives until help arrives.”

Hurricane Harvey’s initial response and ongoing recovery phase, CERT volunteers were instrumental to the success of local agencies and organizations. Team members from across the county volunteered at shelters and donation centers, assisted their neighbors, served with traffic control, and helped emergency responders transport residents to safety after they were evacuated from their homes.

To be a CERT member, individuals must complete an extensive eight-week course taught by first responders to improve their proficiency in emergency preparedness basics that can be used in their homes, workplaces, and communities.

Currently, Harris County Citizen Corps membership includes 30,000 trained volunteers involved in 274 Community Emergency Response Teams; 21,984 volunteers from 24 Volunteers in Police Service agencies; 4,165 volunteers from the Medical Reserve Corps; 6,137 volunteers from the 351 neighborhoods participating in the USAonWatch program; and 24 Fire Corps programs.

To join Harris County Citizen Corps, or for more information about the CERT program go to www.harriscountycitizencorps.com. Harris County Citizen Corps news and updates are also available on Facebook.

We would like to thank all of the participating partners, response agencies, and sponsors.

Sponsors: AutoZone, Bering’s Hardware, CenterPoint Energy, East Aldine Management District, ExxonMobil, Jason’s Deli, Memorial Hermann Life Flight, More Prepared, ProPac, Royal Cup Coffee, Schepps/Dean Foods, Shipley’s Donuts, Southeast Regional LEPC, Southwest Airlines, Survivor Filter, Target, Tin Roof BBQ, Top Brass, Uline, United States Coast Guard, Waste Management, and Whole Earth Provision Co.,

Thank you! You made the 12th annual Harris County CERT Rodeo a huge success.

There were 17 CERTs representing:
Assemblea Popular de Houston CERT
Bay CERT
Cy-Fair CERT
Dallas CERT
Deaf & Hearing Impaired HCIL CERT
Harbor 1929 CERT
Holy Ghost CERT
Humble CERT
ICERV
JV CERT
Katy Area CERT
Lindale CERT
Mansfield CERT
P-Fire CERT
Precinct 1 CERT
SW Hispanic CERT Houston
Tomball CERT 

This year’s VIP observers came from: Atlanta, Georgia.

The 2018 CERT Rodeo events included ten stations and incident command teams.

Station 1 - Triage:
Teams had five minutes to triage 25 patients whose injuries were listed on cards. Each team had to sort the cards: Immediate, Delayed, or Dead, then the teams had five additional minutes to reevaluate and triage again after the cards were turned over.

 

Station 2 - Medical Treatment:
Six patients were marked with injuries. Teams performed a head-to-toe assessment, evaluated as Immediate, Delayed or Dead and then had to treat the injuries with available materials.

 

Station 3 - Gang Plank Team Building:
A team of four covered a 20-foot distance on two 8-ft. wooden planks with rope handles. At the turn around, four different team members returned to the start/finish line.

 

Station 4 - Tower Search & Rescue:
Teams had 15 minutes to complete the task. Numbered tennis balls were hidden throughout the burn building. Two-person teams searched and retrieved the balls.

 

Station 5 - Fire Suppression:
Teams approached and suppressed four small fires using the P.A.S.S. (pull, aim, squeeze, sweep) method.

 

Station 6 - Patient Transport:
Teams had 15 minutes to assess three victims, evaluate and transport. Each victim was to be approached and triaged.

 

Station 7 – Evidence Identification:
Teams had 15 minutes to search the field and cross the finish line. A single line search was done across the designated search area looking for evidence.